Monday, August 25, 2014

Wishing it Were True

While investigating the validity of Christianity, Sheldon Vanauken corresponded with C.S. Lewis to discover how he went from agnosticism to faith. Within the correspondence Vanauken wrote:

And so I wish it were true and would accept any humbling, I think, for it to be true. The bad part of wishing it were true is that any impulse I feel towards belief is regarded with suspicion as stemming from the wish

Below is the response Lewis provided. Note that wd. is for would:

And now, another point about wishes. A wish may lead to false beliefs, granted. But what does the existence of the wish suggest? At one time I was much impressed by Arnold's line 'Nor does the being hungry prove that we have bread.' But surely, tho' it doesn't prove that one particular man will get food, it does prove that there is such a thing as food! i.e. if we were a species that didn't normally eat, weren't designed to eat, wd. we feel hungry? You say the materialist universe is 'ugly'. I wonder how you discovered that! If you are really a product of a materialistic universe, how is it you don't feel at home there? Do fish complain of the sea for being wet? Or if they did, would that fact itself not strongly suggest that they had not always been, or wd. not always be, purely aquatic creatures?Notice how we are perpetually surprised at Time. ('How time flies! Fancy John being grown-up & married! I can hardly believe it!') In heaven's name, why? Unless, indeed, there is something in us which is not temporal.

Feel free to give your thoughts on the response provided by Lewis.

Both quotations are taken from Vanauken's A Severe Mercy.

Stand firm in Christ,
Chase

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